"Students were required to bring a one-to-one device at Year 9 - we came to the conclusion that the iPad is the most suitable machine and recommended it to parents."
Don't let e-safety worries be a barrier to using social media in school  

Using social media in school doesn't have to cause e-safety panics. This practical guide offers great advice for those yet to embrace social networking. Photograph:

It is clear that one of the major obstacles to adopting social networking is that of e-safety. This issue of safeguarding is commonly used as a barrier to innovative technology use with reasons cited such as "I'm not technically proficient".

However, there is very little technical knowledge required, if any at all. A clear understanding of the fundamental issues and how to risk assess are a significant stepping stone to overcoming this barrier.

Social networking raises many obvious (and some not so obvious) e-safety concerns in schools. E-safety from the context of school governance is much like health and safety; the responsibility of the school and its staff, governors and parents is to mitigate risk by reasonable endeavour. In much the same way that technology should not drive the curriculum, e-safety should not be your showstopper (in most cases) regarding innovation.

Regardless of what we do there is a risk involved; driving to and from work, lifting something off the floor and, as I found out recently to the detriment of my back, keeping fit!

In all of the above examples we are taught to be safe by doing, not by sitting in front of a Powerpoint. In the same way I don't promote sitting in a classroom and teaching e-safety because it is difficult to teach something which is constantly evolving; certainly you can discuss the risks (predators, bullying, personal information, trolls to name a few) but a fundamental outcome of e-safety is to empower the user from a young age to enjoy technology through safe use.

Again going back to the driving analogy, practicing your driving skills and risk assessing hazards becomes second nature; this is a life skill, not a lesson.

The three fundamentals that I work to are policy, liability, safe use.

 

 

Source: The Guardian

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