"Facebook was the most suitable tool for our goal of an interactive approach to the study of Romeo and Juliet, because it was the easiest way to achieve the kind of collaboration we were aiming for."
Video Watch
Welcome to Video Watch, our look at instructional and educationally-focused videos that we think will interest you. Just click and watch!

If there are any videos you’d like to share, to send us the link.
Video of the Week
The TimeMap of World History  
Explore world history with The TimeMap of World History (timemaps.com/home/time-map). Starting at 3,500 BC, this site cleverly combines maps, timelines and chronological narratives to provide a visual guide to each civilisation and nation in history.
Added: 27/04/2012
The TimeMap of World History  
Explore world history with The TimeMap of World History (timemaps.com/home/time-map). Starting at 3,500 BC, this site cleverly combines maps, timelines and chronological narratives to provide a visual guide to each civilisation and nation in history.
Posted: 27/04/2012
 
Search Team  
Search Team (searchteam.com) is a collaborative search engine that lets you and your students/colleagues/friends create better search results. Save related and relevant information and avoid duplicate search results. Also add comments and ‘likes’. Once you register add others to collaborate on searches.
Posted: 27/04/2012
 
Instagrok  
Instagrok (instagrok.com) is a search engine for educational materials. It finds and filters age-appropriate content on the internet. Use it to explore and understand – or ‘grok’ – any topic of interest. Search results include a visual graph, key facts, websites, videos, images, and quiz questions.
Posted: 27/04/2012
 
What is Pinterest?  
It’s an online pinboard that lets you organise and share images you find on the internet. You can also view pinboards created by others, which seems like a great way to find new resources and get inspiration from people who share your interests. It’s been dubbed a ‘visual social network’.
Posted: 27/04/2012
 
Add voice to your presentations  
Add voice to your presentations (PowerPoint, Prezi, etc), lectures, documents, photos, video clips, photos, and others with My Brainshark (brainshark.com). You simply upload your content and add the audio by phone, microphone, or an MP3 upload. Share the results via email or social media, or embed in your website or blog.
Posted: 27/04/2012
 
Introducing Scratch  
Scratch is a programming language designed to make it easy for students (specifically 8-16 years old) to put together a simple interactive computer program. It makes it easy to create interactive art, stories, simulations, and games – and then share them online.
Posted: 27/04/2012
 
Raz-Kids (raz-kids.com)  
I’ve used this as an adjunct to my reading programme for a number of years. Students can listen to books for modeled fluency, record themselves reading (available for the teacher to take a running record from), and sit comprehension quizzes. The information generated from these activities gives data that’s very useful for informing next step learning.
Posted: 27/04/2012
 
Scratch for teachers  
The Scratch website has a section just for teachers. Here you’ll find advice, tutorials, videos and other resources for successfully using the tool in your classroom. Also check out ScratchED, an online community where you can share stories, exchange resources, ask questions, and find other Scratch educators. info.scratch.mit.edu/Educators and scratched.media.mit.edu
Posted: 27/04/2012
 
My all-time favourite piece of software is …  
HyperStudio (hyperstudio.com). A number of programs are able to deliver the ability to present multimedia content but HyperStudio has the added advantage of being able to draw/paint and animate the students own content. This leads to very rich, original content. This is a wonderful program for enhancing curriculum and all of the key competencies. Collaborative and cooperative projects become alive with rich content!
Posted: 27/04/2012
 
YouTube for Schools (youtube.com/schools)  
YouTube for Schools is designed to give schools controlled use of videos on YouTube EDU, while preventing access to the rest of YouTube. By signing up, you can customise content and also create playlists of videos that are viewable only within your school's network. Students cannot log in or search, and viewing is limited to YouTube EDU videos (plus any your school has added). All comments and related videos are also disabled. There’s also a teachers’ section (youtube.com/teachers) that has hundreds of playlists of videos that are organised by subject and grade.
Posted: 27/04/2012